Video “How To Cut A Golf Shaft To Length” Part 8 of Basics of Golf Clubmaking Now Showing!

Learn How To Cut A Graphite or Steel Golf Shaft To Length The Proper Way!

Download Hireko Golf CatalogHireko Golf’s technical director Jeff Summitt will demonstrate how to cut a golf club to length manually from the butt end. You will find out first how length is measured to obtain our final length and account for the additional length of the grip cap. For a graphite shaft, we are going to use our rod saw blade and a tubing cutter for the steel shaft; the preferred methods when cutting a golf shaft by hand.


Basics of Clubmaking Video Series

Does the Flex of Your Wedge Shaft Matter?

Maybe a change to your wedge shaft may rejuvenate your short game too, but just don’t assume if you see a “wedge” shaft that is the only option you have.

SK Fiber Wedge Force Golf Shaft

SK Fiber Wedge Force Shaft
Finally a performance graphite golf shaft designed specifically for the scoring wedges. Crafted with a firm butt and responsive tip section for optimal launch angles and ball spin. BUY HERE FOR ONLY $38 EACH

How often do you take a full swing with your golf wedges? Trace back to your last round and recall all those ¾ or ½ pitch shots, chips from just beyond the apron or your greenside bunker play – all of those are taken with less than a full shot. Now think about this for a second. Since they are taken with less than a full effort and your swing speed is reduced, so should the flex of your shaft be reduced as well? After all a slower swing speed player is recommended to use a softer flexed shaft than someone stronger than them. Therefore I wanted to investigate does golf wedge flex makes any difference in accuracy and feel.

Download Hireko Golf Equipment CatalogFirst, let’s look at buying habits amongst consumers. If you look at all the name brand golf wedges on the market, what kind of shafts do they have in them? The #1 shaft by far is a version of the iconic Dynamic Gold S-flex taper tip (typically labeled as “Wedge” flex). You may also see some similar weight and stiffness golf shafts in the likes of the KBS Tour Shaft or the Dynamic Gold Spinner golf shaft too. But let me emphasize this fact, in a blade style wedge from any of the major manufacturers, they do not offer a single Regular of Senior flex shaft to match what you may be using in the rest of your set. So in the minds of the major OEMs, either flex must not matter in golf wedges or they only offer this option because the professional golfers like that combination (again in a blade style wedge) and the rest of the golfing population are lemmings and buy what the manufacturers dictate. OK, maybe I am a cynic.

To test my theory, I used the SK Fiber Wedge Force golf shafts because they came in 3 basic flexes and had a similar shaft profile to one another. In addition, as the flex is reduced, the weight reduced as well. I set these up at 35.75” with a slightly oversize grip into three identical loft / lie Power Play Raw Spin 56º wedges. Each came out at D3. The rest of the specs are below.

Wedge Flex Chart 1
I should state what the 5-iron flex equivalent is.  In steel golf shafts, the frequency increases @ 4-5 cpm per club (shorter) due to the normal tip trimming or the suggested raw length of the taper tip shaft by the manufacturer.  So if we were to account for the shorter length and slightly higher swingweights on the wedges compared to the rest of the numbers irons, you would typically see a 15-17 cpm increase in frequency over the 5-iron.

The literature from SK Fiber Golf (I know we own it now) inadvertently lists the 100g model as A-flex, 110 as R-flex and 120 as S-flex.  While there may be some A-flex steel-shafted #5 irons that measure between 293-295 cpm, there are a number of popular lightweight S-flex steel shafts that do as well.  So in reality, the 100 model is not an A-flex shaft. Another way to think about it is a softer version in the SK Fiber Wedge Force shaft family (or Baby Bear) compared to the 110 (Momma Bear) and 120 (Papa Bear) just the same way that not all S-flex shafts are the same stiffness.

To put this all in perspective, if a Dynamic Gold S-flex taper tip wedge shaft was set up in the same manner, the cut shaft weight would have been @ 119 g, overall weight of 471 g (would have had to use a lighter weight head to achieve D3) and a frequency of 339.  This would have been close to the Wedge Force 120 model specifications.

I not only wanted to test partial shots but also full shots with each of these clubs.  For the record, I normally play R-flex in heavier weight steel and S-flex in some of the lighter and more flexible offerings. Another golfer who I had conduct the same test was also using R-flex in his irons and of course S-flex in his golf wedges (because that is all that came stock with them).

Finesse shots
The range I frequent for all my testing is one of the top 100 in the nation, so there are lots of flags set to certain distances to make it easier to hone in on your short yardages.  Alternating among the three sand wedges as well as different targets, I came to the conclusion quickly that having the proper length (for solidness of contact), loft (for trajectory), lie (for direction) are far more important based on the accuracy of these variable weight and flex wedges.  I couldn’t say one way or another that any one of the golf wedges was night and day difference in distance and directional control.  However, the lightest and most flexible felt the best and most natural to me.  Based on feel and no loss of control, I would have picked the SK Fiber Wedge Force 100 golf shaft or a shaft based upon the literature I honestly would have never had even tried.

The other player had a similar experience as me as far as the more flexible and lighter wedge didn’t cause him to loose accuracy.  Of course at the beginning I did not tell him what I was handing to him.  However, he could detect the weight differential of the 3 immediately, but could not tell there was any flex difference until later when I told him.  Over time, I thought the two he hit best were the lightest and the heaviest wedge, but in the end he preferred the feel of the heavier model as it was more familiar to what he had been using.

Full shots
Here is where I thought the biggest issue would be concerning distance and directional control by moving up and down in flex.  When I say a full shot, I was not referring to jumping out of my shoes and trying to hit the ball farther. Who does that with a golf wedge anyway?  What I was surprised by was the directional consistency of each one.  After all these were blade style wedges offering little in the way of game improvement features. On the other hand they are shorter so they should be more controllable and easier to make solid contact. There was no glaring tendency other than the heaviest shafted wedge may have tended to go more right of my target than the other two.  I felt the lightest one went a tad higher and further, but if so, I would have needed a launch monitor to tell me for sure.

The other player felt more comfortable with the heaviest shafted wedge for full shots.  The way he describe the feeling, he had more momentum in his swing with the heavier weight which required less effort to swing.  We could have added swingweight (via lead tape) to the head of the lighter two shafts to see if that would have changed his opinion.

Re-testing
I wanted to repeat the exercise so as not to find my conclusions a fluke. One thing I wanted to make sure I tried was to add 17g of weight to the Wedge Force 100 golf shaft with a clay-like substance that I can easily add or remove that will also stick to the outer side of the shaft when hit.  The weight was placed @ 14” from the butt end so I could achieve the exact same overall weight as the Wedge Force 120 and have the same swingweight too.  So essentially I was testing flex only (at least on paper).  After hitting several shots with the club modified this way, I can tell you that even though the overall weight and swingweight were the same, they didn’t feel alike.  There had to be a difference in the moment of inertia (MOI) between the two.  No longer could I judge distance as well with the additional weight in that position.  After removing the clay-like substance, I was back to form.

Next, I experimented by adding some weight to the heads of the Wedge Force 100, 110 and 120 shafts until I felt the performance improved. This made more of a difference than did the flex of the shaft, especially on the two lighter shaft models.  I had to wait until I got back to my lab to see what the swingweights would be and subsequent flex as the additional weight will reduce the flex as well.

Wedge Flex Article Chart 1

In the end, I had three sand wedges with completely different flexed and weighted sand wedges I had confidence I could hit my targets on both partial and full shots.

Conclusion
I’ll admit pitching chipping has never been my strong suit as I don’t practice enough.  During this exercise over a three day span, that part of my game that had been sadly neglected has now become one of my strengths.  The first night out on the course with the softer and lighter wedge shaft was probably the best exhibition I have had in years to and around the green.

There are by far more club fitting parameters to fit for in a wedge besides flex.  So maybe the OEMs aren’t wrong in only offering one flex shaft for all.  But on the other hand, feel is so integral to this game.  As most shots are made with less than full shots and subsequent slower swing speed, I would opt for a shaft weight (first), swingweight (second) and flex (third) that feels most comfortable in my wedge. That is assuming I already know what head, length and grip size I need first.

To play devil’s advocate, I didn’t use a very flexible ladies or senior graphite shaft so I am not saying that flex does not matter altogether.  But those tend to be much lighter than the shafts I tried.  Anyway, I did say that weight and weight distribution (swingweight or MOI) are more critical factors.  But those that nitpick over a whether to tip trim a little more to offset a higher bottom to bore measurement or soft step a raw length or two to create a little more feel are missing the big picture.

Maybe a change to your wedge shaft may rejuvenate your short game too, but just don’t assume if you see a “wedge” shaft that is the only option you have.  Get custom clubfit!  It can make a difference.

Grafalloy Prolaunch Golf Shaft Sale

FAQ: Dynacraft Prophet ICT Driver and Fairway Woods

Hireko Golf Technical Director Jeff Summitt Answers Some of the Most Frequently Asked Questions About the Dynacraft Prophet ICT Driver and Fairway Woods

Dynacraft ICT Anatomy of AdapterI have been inundated by questions recently about our two Dynacraft Prophet drivers (and fairways too).  I wondered why, as this is a model that has not been part of our active line for a couple years. It finally dawned on me, these were in our latest Spring Quarterly flyer and many customers may be experiencing these clubheads for the very first time. As Hireko’s only interchangeable golf clubheads, these need additional explanation.  So here are some of those questions that I have fielded recently.

Am I missing the Dynacraft ICT adapter because it looks like something screws into the hosel?
You are not missing anything. The adapter is already attached to the head when you receive it. What you are seeing is the rifling or barreling of the hosel. This was added by design because the adapter is made out of aluminum and when bored becomes very smooth. The rifling allows extra “bite” for the epoxy to hold the shaft to the adapter.

Download Hireko Golf CatalogHow do I know what position the adapter is in?
There is a white orientation dot at the base of the adapter. This means you will need to remove the adapter. As shipped, the dot will be pointing toward the toe or in position #1.

Where are the instructions located?
If you go to the product page, look down by the product description and click on the Product Manual tab.  Here you will find the Dynacraft Prophet ICT Adapter Instructions lnk to the instructions.

Dynacraft Prophet ICT Driver

Dynacraft Prophet ICT Driver Clubhead

What is the difference between the two Prophet ICT drivers?
The biggest difference aside from price is cosmetics as their functions and size are the same.  Our original Dynacraft Prophet ICT head features a geometric shape, while the newer of the two versions has a traditional shape.

Do I need to adjust or do any additional tip trimming?
No.  The adapter was developed so that the bottom of bore to ground line and the insertion depth are no different from a bonded driver that you would find today.

Will you get any more adapters?
Unfortunately no, these models are discontinued and the minimum run to produce the adapters was way too much for what we would sell.

Then can you remove a shaft from the adapter and re-shaft it?
Sure, and it is easier than extracting a shaft out of a normal golf clubhead. Simply unscrew the Dynacraft ICTadapter and remove it from the head. Cut off the ferrule if one was installed. Heat up the adapter to break the epoxy bond loose and insert it into your shaft puller. Don’t worry, the adapter is aluminum that has

Dynacraft Prophet ICT Fairway Woods

Dynacraft Prophet ICT Fairway Woods

been anodized black and is not made of plastic that will melt. Watch out, the adapter will be hot so use a glove to catch it as it is extracted from the shaft.

Will you be receiving fill in Dynacraft Prophet 3 woods to match?
The model is now officially retired so no more fill in pieces will be available.

Will you have another adjustable golf driver in the future?
We are constantly working on new products. We just have to make sure before we bring one to market that is does three things. First and foremost, it must perform well out on the course and not just to introduce an adjustable golf driver for the sake of having an adjustable driver. Number two is to make one that is affordable, After all, this is Hireko Golf and there are plenty of expensive adjustable drivers readily available. Lastly, it must not violate any existing patents. We already had one nixed because a patent was released that would had been similar to a concept that we had already worked on for the better part of 6 months.  So it was scraped, but that is the nature of the business.

Hireko Golf Wins 6 Golf Tips Awards

Video “How To Turn Down Golf Ferrules On A Golf Club” Part 7 of Basics of Golf Clubmaking Now Showing!

Learn how to turn down and finish golf club ferrules the proper way!

Download Hireko Golf CatalogContents of this seventh video will explain one the most common steps that beginning clubmakers either dread or avoid doing altogether and why it is important how to do this in the assembly process. In this segment Jeff will demonstrate how to properly finish or turn down a ferrule by hand using normal items such as acetone, steel wool and sandpaper.  Their usage will depend on how severe the lip is against the top of the hosel.

View all Basics of Golf Clubmaking Videos Here!

Dynacraft VLS Adjustable Wedge

The Golf World On Your Wrist – New Garmin Golf GPS Watches Now Available At Hireko Golf!

Garmin GPS Golf Watches
Rugged, waterproof Garmin Golf GPS Watches are packed with thousands of preloaded golf courses

Garmin GPS golf watches pack powerful features into a small package. They put distances to the green, doglegs and layups at your fingertips. Preloaded with thousands of courses, Garmin Approach® golf watches are ready to go right out of the box — no subscriptions or fees necessary. You can access exact yardages to the front, back and Garmin GPS Golf Watchesmiddle of greens, as well as distances to doglegs and layups. Updates are available for free, which add new courses to your device and keep existing ones current.

Input and save customizable yardage points — including water hazards and bunkers — to help you more precisely place your shots. The Measure Shot feature will calculate yardages for shots played anywhere on the course.

When the ball drops in the cup, record it on your watch’s digital scorecard. Later, you can break down your game by downloading your data to your computer and analyzing each shot. Because it has a built-in odometer, you can even see how far you walked during your round.

Shop All Garmin GPS Golf Watches Here!

Free Shipping On Ogio Golf Bags From Hireko Golf

79% Off Black Widow Fusion Grips!

Black Widow Fusion GripsBlack Widow Grips Web Traction Technology provides improved grip confidence and promotes proper grip pressure for greater swing speed.

Download Hireko Golf Catalog

The Black Widow Fusion grip features a firm and highly textured dual-compound composition for enhanced feel and control. Available in black/red only and versatile in all climate conditions.

ALL SALES FINAL! NO RETURNS ON CLOSEOUT BLACK WIDOW FUSION GRIPS.

BUY BLACK WIDOW FUSION GRIPS HERE FOR ONLY $1.49 EACH!

Acer XS Titanium Driver

New Videoblog: Why Are Golf Grips Made In Different Sizes?

Hireko’s Technical Director Jeff Summitt will show you why hand size and where you place the golf grip in your hand require different sizes.

How do I know the proper size golf grip for my golf game? As the golf grip is the only contact a player makes with a golf club, it only makes sense that when selecting the right golf grip it should be custom fitted so the player can keep their hands position on the club in the same place and encourage more consistency from shot to shot.

Black Widow Fusion Standard/Black Round Golf Grip

Video Part 6 ” How To Install A Golf Ferrule and Epoxy The Golf Shaft Onto A Golf Clubhead” Now Showing!

Want to know how to install a golf ferrule and epoxy the golf shaft onto a golf clubhead the easy and proper way?

Download Hireko Golf CatalogContents of this sixth video will demonstrate how to install a basic golf club ferrule as well as epoxy the golf shaft onto a golf clubhead. In this segment, we are going to use a golf ferrule installation tool to get the ferrule started. Jeff will also demonstrate measuring and mixing 2-part high strength golf shafting epoxy the right way for a long lasting bond.

Want to learn how to assemble a golf club?

Have fun and learn how to assemble a custom golf club, while getting started In custom golf clubmaking in just a few short minutes. The “Basic Golf Clubmaking Video Series” of easy to understand and step-by-step golf clubmaking videos are taught by Hireko Golf’s Technical Director Jeff Summitt. Jeff will walk you through all the basic steps required and show you how to build a golf club from golf components. The benefits of assembling your own golf clubs are many from the financial rewards to being able to match the components and their specifications specifically to your swing characteristics, naturally lowering your scores. In addition, assembling golf clubs from components in a great new hobby that not only you can enjoy and perfect throughout your lifetime, but can potentially become profitable as well.

BASICS OF GOLF CLUBMAKING VIDEO SERIES
Part 1. Getting Started With Golf Clubmaking Video

Contents of this first video on how to assemble a golf club include the tools and materials needed to get started plus handy tips to make sure you always begin your assembly process correctly.

Part 2 Test Fitting Golf Components

Contents of this second video will teach you proper pre-assembly techniques. It is always a wise practice to check the fit of the head and shaft prior to building your golf club.

Part 3 How To Read Golf Shaft Trimming Instructions

Contents of this third video will explain how to read and understand tip trimming tables so you know how properly tip trim a golf shaft.  With golf shafts becoming more and more expensive, one tip trims the golf shaft (if any is required) so the shaft plays the flex as the manufacturer and you don’t make an expensive mistake.

Part 4 How To Tip Trim A Golf Shaft

Contents of this fourth video will demonstrate how to tip trim steel golf shafts and how to tip trim graphite golf shafts manually.  For a steel shaft, we are going to use our tubing cutter; the preferred method when cutting a golf shaft by hand. However, to safely cut a graphite or composite golf shaft, we will use a rod saw blade to avoid cracking or splintering what could potentially be a very expensive shaft.

Part 5 How To Properly Abrade or Sand a Golf Shaft Tip

Contents of this fifth video will demonstrate how to properly abrade (prep, sand or roughen) the tip of a golf shaft manually. For both steel and graphite shafts, we are going to use different grits of sandpaper using a shoeshine method. When done properly, this will allow a proper surface for the epoxy and not cause damage to the shaft at a later date.

Part 6 How To Install A Golf Ferrule and Apply Epoxy Onto A Golf Shaft

Contents of this sixth video will demonstrate how to install a basic golf club ferrule as well as epoxy the golf shaft onto a golf clubhead. In this segment, we are going to use a golf ferrule installation tool to get the ferrule started. Jeff will also demonstrate measuring and mixing 2-part high strength golf shafting epoxy the right way for a long lasting bond.

Basic tools needed for the “How To Assemble a Custom Golf Club” series include:

Bench Vise
Vinyl Shaft Clamp #RAVC $2.20 each
48″ Clubmaking Ruler #MIT025 $10.99 each
Tubing Cutter
Hacksaw
Rod Saw Blade #GG12-50T $3.95 each
Sandpaper (Course 80-110 grit, Medium 150-180 grit)
Utility Knife #MIT051 $9.95 each
Golf Ferrule Installation Tool #FBLOCK $19.95 each
Catch Basin

and materials you will need:

24-hour, high strength Golf Shafting Epoxy #EP05 $5.95 each
Sandpaper
Masking Tape
Two-Way Golf Grip Tape #PIP $.40 per strip
Felt Tip Marker
Golf Grip Solvent #SV02 $3.95 each
Acetone
Paper Towels
Golf Ferrules Starts $2.45
000 Steel Wool



Dynacraft VLS Adjustable Weight Wedge

Basics of Golf Clubmaking Video Series Part 4 & 5 Now Online!

Basics of Golf Clubmaking SeriesNew To Golf Clubmaking? Follow Our New Clubmaking Video Series!

Download the Hireko Golf CatalogHave fun and learn how to assemble a custom golf club, while getting started In custom golf clubmaking in just a few short minutes. The “Basic Golf Clubmaking Video Series” of easy to understand and step-by-step golf clubmaking videos are taught by Hireko Golf’s Technical Director Jeff Summitt. Jeff will walk you through all the basic steps required and show you how to build a golf club from golf components. The benefits of assembling your own golf clubs are many from the financial rewards to being able to match the components and their specifications specifically to your swing characteristics, naturally lowering your scores. In addition, assembling golf clubs from components in a great new hobby that not only you can enjoy and perfect throughout your lifetime, but can potentially become profitable as well.

BASICS OF GOLF CLUBMAKING VIDEO SERIES

Part 4 How To Tip Trim A Golf Shaft

Contents of this fourth video will demonstrate how to tip trim steel golf shafts and how to tip trim graphite golf shafts manually.  For a steel golf shaft, we are going to use our tubing cutter; the preferred method when cutting a golf club shaft by hand. However, to safely cut a graphite or composite golf shaft, we will use a rod saw blade to avoid cracking or splintering what could potentially be a very expensive shaft.

Part 5 How To Properly Abrade or Sand a Golf Shaft Tip

Contents of this fifth video will demonstrate how to properly abrade (prep, sand or roughen) the tip of a golf shaft manually. For both steel golf shafts and graphite golf shafts, we are going to use different grits of sandpaper using a shoeshine method. When done properly, this will allow a proper surface for the epoxy and not cause damage to the shaft at a later date.

 

Basic tools needed for the “How To Assemble a Custom Golf Club” series include:

Bench Vise
Vinyl Shaft Clamp #RAVC $2.20 each
48″ Clubmaking Ruler #MIT025 $10.99 each
Tubing Cutter
Hacksaw
Rod Saw Blade #GG12-50T $3.95 each
Sandpaper (Course 80-110 grit, Medium 150-180 grit)
Utility Knife #MIT051 $9.95 each
Golf Ferrule Installation Tool #FBLOCK $19.95 each
Catch Basin

and materials you will need:

24-hour, high strength Golf Shafting Epoxy #EP05 $5.95 each
Sandpaper
Masking Tape
Two-Way Golf Grip Tape #PIP $.40 per strip
Felt Tip Marker
Golf Grip Solvent #SV02 $3.95 each
Acetone
Paper Towels
Golf Ferrules Starts $2.45
000 Steel Wool

2013 GDW Adapters & OEM Replacement Products