Does Resale Value Factor Into Your Golf Club Purchases?

Don’t let the potential resale value of a golf club be a reason to purchase one.

Are you deciding between a standard stock club(s) straight off-the-rack verses a custom made club(s) because the standard stock club will have a greater resale value?  If so, you should think about this. You are going to take a huge loss regardless compared to what you originally paid for them when you trade in your clubs.  After all, who ever takes in the trade-in has to make a profit to resell your set.  Sadly but true, clubs equipped with stock offerings (length, shaft, grip) will have a higher resale value than those that have been customized or altered slightly from a manufacturers standard specifications. After all, you or the buyer will have to find another customer that fits your specifications or cut the price so the player have afford to have to modified to his or her specs.

Another very important consideration, there is a very good chance the standard stock club will not fit you for length, lie, and shaft type or grip size. If so, you will never be able to hit the clubs to your full potential.  In that case your investment is not a very good one and not a valid excuse to opt for the stock setting for the higher resell value.  The bad part is maybe there is only one specification that is different than the stock offering such as the length 1/2” longer, lie 2 degree flatter or the grip midsize instead of standard and the cost of the upgrade may be minimal, if at all.

When you buy a custom suit, the idea behind that investment is that you intend to use it because you know that it fits and not because of the potential resale value.  After you get your use out of the custom fit suit (or out grow it), you are only going to donate it to charity, give it to a fellow friend or family member that it might come close to fitting (they can have altered) or throw it away if it badly used.

Golf clubs should have the same amount of consideration when buying them – the intent that they will work the first time you take them out.  If you are unsure if a stock club will fit, don’t buy the whole set.  You can buy a single club first.  If it fits, then you can buy the rest of the clubs around it.  In the unfortunate event it does not fit, you are not out much and in many cases the club can be altered to fit for a nominal fee. Don’t let the potential resale value of a golf club be a reason to purchase one.

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What Did WorldGolf.com Say About The New Acer CB7 & CB8 Putters?

“Hireko Golf’s Acer Cb7 and Cb8 putters are wicked both in style and performance”

The following review was posted on WorldGolf.com by Senior Writer Kiel Christianson.

Custom Assembled Acer CB7 Putter $44.95 ea.

Golf has traditionally been a rather genteel game. Although gentlemanly competition is undeniably good for the soul, there is only so much argyle and velvet-wrapped grips that a man can take before something gives.

One minute you’re teeing off from the tips with a cigar clenched in your teeth, and the next thing you know, you’re picking out an aromatherapy candle.

My point is that every now and then, a man’s got to feel like a guy. And now more than ever, golf itself needs to appeal to a wider demographic, including guys who wouldn’t be caught dead within a mile of plus-fours or white wingtips.

Hireko Golf has recently introduced some putters that have not only broken a few molds – they look like they could be used to break a few skulls. The Acer Cb7 and Cb8 seem to be fashioned from patterns found in tattoos or on the gas tanks of custom choppers.

In short, they’re wicked both in style and performance.

How Hireko Golf’s Acer Cb7 and Cb8 putters play

The Acer Cb7 ($45, assembled) is a center-shafted, face-balanced mallet

Custom Assembled Acer CB8 Putter $44.95 ea.

with a straight shaft. Extreme heel-toe balance is achieved via four-inch prongs extending back from the face.

These prongs curl inward as they taper, resembling raptor talons. There’s a ball-width alignment aid directly behind the face, and a small, milled graphite insert in the face to get the ball rolling and provide feedback.

The Acer Cb8 ($45, assembled) is even more radical in appearance, with thicker prongs that look like lock-blade knives. There is also a ball-sized, glittering disk attached to the back of the alignment aid bar.

The Cb 8 does not have a face insert, but it is more heel-shafted, with a small double-bend shaft.

Both of these flat sticks are heavy, and the heft is intended to help keep your wrists and hands out of the stroke. They’re incredibly easy to keep on-plane throughout the stroke and provide excellent feel and sound. The matte-finished clubheads reduce reflective glare, and the white-trimmed alignment aids really stand out to the eye, making alignment very simple.

The designs of these putters might not be for everyone, but if you want to make a statement – or need to beat a rabid raccoon to death during your round – there are not many other putters on the market that will do the job quite as well or at such a reasonable price.

And in these tough economic times, golf could use a few more players, including guys with tattoo sleeves and custom bikes.

Just remember to follow this simple advice: Give these guys every putt inside three feet.

Acer CB7 Putter Assembled Price (comes with Free! Headcover!) $44.95

Acer CB8 Putter Component Clubhead Price $44.95

One of the Newest Trends in Golf: Drivers Under 300g

Is Lighter Better?

Humans are enamored by numbers.  For example, the media gets in a tizzy whenever a new century or decade rolls around.  Or we use numbers for benchmarks like they are magical, for instance when the Dow reaches 10,000 or the S&P at 2,000.  In golf, players get excited the first time they break 100 or 90, but never a number like 95.  So it should come as no surprise the new fascination in golf club marketing is drivers that are under 300g.

Back in the old days when woods were made out of wood and shaft of steel, a driver weighed 13 ounces.  Just goes to show you how long 20 years ago seems, heck, we didn’t use grams back then.  Well for you metric challenged individuals, 13 ounces is the equivalent of 368.5g.  Over the years golfers have moved away from shiny chromed steel shafts for much lighter weight and colorful graphite shafts in attempt to gain more distance off of the tee. It must have worked as you don’t see steel shafted drivers these days.

Chances are in your golf bag right now is some sort of large headed titanium driver with a 60 something gram graphite shaft assembled at 45”.  The reason why, that has been the modern men’s standard for the past several years.  By now you know heads have been much larger over the years and are capped out at 460cc.  Yet the weight of the head has not change from the days of the wooden head.  For the most part, the majority of manufacturers make their driver heads 200g +/-4g which is quite a small range when you consider the different philosophies that exist in the golf industry.

The biggest impact on weight reduction has come in the shaft.  The modern shaft is nearly half the weight of its steel predecessors.  With newer materials, they are becoming lighter and lighter each year.

Standard sized men’s grips have pretty much held the line at 50 grams for some time now, except for just recently with the debut of the new WinnLite grips.  Both those are the exceptions rather than the rule.  This means the modern driver is approximately 320g, which is nearly 2 oz. lighter than the previous generation of steel-shafted drivers.  Don’t forget to factor in @ 5g for items like epoxy, grip tape and the ferrule. So the goal of making a sub-300g driver is not far away.

In fact most ladies driver are almost there anyway because of the smaller and lighter grip (40g) used and the shorter assembly length.  They tip the scales closer to 305g.  But for men’s driver to get there and not make the head any lighter required the use of very light shaft in the neighborhood of 45g.  If you look through the catalogs, shafts this weight are far and few between.  Examples are Grafalloy’s ProLaunch Blue 45 and Apollo’s Masterflex HP48.

The easiest way to reduce the weight now is with one of the newer breed of lightweight grips.  This is one of the secrets the name brand manufacturers have in combination with a lighter shaft when making their sub-300g drivers.  As you can see from the chart, even using a common 65g graphite shaft and one of the WinnLite grips can match this feat.

If you want to make the lightest possible driver you can use a combination of a lightweight grip and shaft and tickle the ivories at a mere 275g or 9.7 oz. for you fossils out there. Now there is nothing magical because the weight of a driver is now 299 verses 304 or even 320g.  Good marketing?  Perhaps, due to the fact that people are fascinated with numbers. But will the customer see a difference going to these lighter drivers is the most important point.  I will tell you this, not everyone will benefit from these sub 300g drivers, just like not all golfers can use X-flex shaft or 46” drivers.  This is just another custom fitting option that is available to golfers today.  But I wanted to show you how this happens and what components to look at if your goal is a lighter weight driver for potentially more speed and distance.

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Download for Free the New 2010 Shaft Fitting Addendum

Don’t live in the dark ages anymore, especially with the high cost of shafts today.  Get the information you really need to compare one shaft to another. For 18 consecutive years, the annual Shaft Fitting Addendum has been the number one resource available for clubmakers and ordinary golfers to find invaluable information on golf shafts.  The 2010 Shaft Fitting Addendum has just been updated with over 100 new shaft entries available to you today.

If you are looking to advance your knowledge on the ever-confusing world of shafts, take this opportunity to download the 2010 Shaft Fitting Addendum.  This is a companion piece to one of the best books written about shafts called the Modern Guide to Shaft Fitting. And the best part is both of these books are available for free. This is just another example of how Hireko is helping out clubmakers, club fitters and fellow golfers alike by providing you with such indispensable information so you can make more well-informed choices when it comes to purchasing new equipment.

What Type of Information Will You Find?

For those that are not already familiar with the Shaft Fitting Addendum, the first thing you will find out is not all R-flex shafts are created equal – that is in terms of flex, torque, bend point, etc. as every manufacturer are their own standard.  In reality, there are no industry standards for shafts and the reason why this book serves as a valuable guide.  Consistency has been the key to this text as each of the over 3000 shafts and 50,000 measurements has been conducted by one individual using the same set of procedures and equipment for the past 21 years.

There are 19 published specifications listed for each shaft that include:

Flex, Uncut Shaft Weight, Tip Diameter, Butt Diameter, Uncut Shaft Balance Point, Cut Shaft Balance Point, Completed Club Balance Point, Total Assembled Club Weight, Head Weight, Grip Weight, Cut Shaft Weight, Completed Club Frequency, Butt Deflection, Tip Deflection, T/B Ratio, Cut Shaft Torque, Raw Shaft Torque, Club Length (and wood bore type) and DSFI (Dynamic Shaft Fitting Index) Rating

To give you a peek of what information is available, look at the chart below. You can compare shafts from the same or even different manufacturers that are of approximately the same overall stiffness and weight.  In this case the Aldila Serrano, Fujikura Fit-On E250, Grafalloy ProLaunch Blue 55, ProLaunch Platinum with Axis Technology, New Image Red Image Graphite and our own True Ace Death Stick are all mid-50g shafts of similar frequencies and stiffness index.  But find out what the differences are.


How Do I Use the Information?

While offering all of this data is great, being able to take this information, understand what all the numbers represent and then be able apply it into your everyday fitting is another.  This is why we established the Dynamic Shaft Fitting Index (or DSFI for short).  The DSFI takes the Completed Club Frequency, Butt Deflection, Tip Deflection, Cut Shaft Torque and Club Length and puts it into a complex algorithm to put a number on stiffness.  No longer do you need to rely solely on the generic flex designations by the manufacturers.

In Chapter 5, the addendum explains why you may want to select the Aldila Serrano over the Grafalloy ProLaunch Platinum or visa versa. You can also relate Dynamic Shaft Fitting Index to the clubhead speed or the golfer’s driver or 5-iron and be able to make appropriate shaft selections. However, swing speed is only a starting point – certain golfers will use different flexes based on their tempo and length of their swing rather just swing speed.  The 2010 Shaft Fitting Addendum can help you understand these issues.

The 187 page Shaft Fitting Addendum is broken down into 5 chapters, but you don’t have to download everything.  The first shaft provides the legends of what each of the specifications are and we would encourage you to read that carefully.  Chapters 2 and 5 are the nuts and bolts of the 2010 Shaft Fitting Addendum with Chapter 2 showing the data and Chapter 5 providing the how to use the information with the master charts in order of stiffness.

In addition, club fitters or even ordinary golfers can look for suitable replacement shafts that may not exist anymore by looking through the archived shafts (Chapters 3 and 4). These are all the shafts tested that are no longer available but may contain information on shafts you have hit well in the past. Matching shafts of similar cut weight, frequency, cut torque and tip and butt deflections will help you find that one shaft you owned previously that they liked so dearly.

So don’t be like a member of Congress and do absolutely nothing, download the 2010 Shaft Fitting Addendum today.

Download Chapter 1
Download Chapter 2
Download Chapter 3
Download Chapter 4
Download Chapter 5

Download the New Spring Flyer!

Check out the new 2010 product line & new lower pricing on tons of closeouts!

The new Spring 2010 Hireko Flyer highlights the new Acer XDS Insider line,  PGA Show update, new shafts and grips and new lower pricing on hundreds of closeouts.

Flyer size: 5 meg

You can download from either server below. If one is busy, then download from the other.  Thank you!

Download March 2010 Hireko Flyer (Hireko)

if above is busy, then try Google Docs at:

Download March 2010 Hireko Flyer (Google Docs)

Both sites above download the same flyer.

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