Taper Tip Iron Shafts Now In Stock!

Hireko is Now Stocking Taper Tip Steel Iron Shafts

We are now stocking two of the most popular taper tip iron shafts of all time from True Temper – Dynamic Gold and TT Lite. This will allow you to consolidate your purchasing, save money on shipping and put more profit in your clubmaking business. To let you know, if you are not already familiar with taper tip shafts, these are not designed to fit into any of our club heads. Rather they are used for replacement shafts in a number of name brand club’s irons which require .355″ shafts such as Ping, Titleist, Mizuno and many more. Below is a chart of the recommended raw length shaft for each club.

*Note that the recommended raw lengths for the Dynamic Gold and TT Lite are not the same. Unlike a standard 0.370” parallel tip iron shaft where you tip trim for the club, taper tip shafts will not allow that procedure and still be able to get the shaft to seat fully into the hosel. Therefore you have to order a specific raw length for each clubhead and then you will butt trim to your final length.

True Temper Dynamic Gold Tapered $13.25 each

True Temper TT Lite Tapered $7.90 each

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How to Make More Money During the Slow Season

Make Your Slow Season Profitable

While the golf season for many has been hampered by colder-than-normal temperatures and unusually large amounts of snow across the nation, some clubmaking shops might be feeling the pinch.  But here are some tips to help you increase your profits during an otherwise slow period of the year.

    1. Now is the time to dig through your inventory of products you may have stashed away like heads, shafts and grips that are no longer “current” models.  These are items that can be perhaps discounted when you have a customer looking for a bargain.  Offer buy 7 irons, get one iron free or throw in a hybrid or wedge with the purchase of a set of irons.  Getting something for free is often considered a higher perceived value than just discounting the price even if the difference is the same.  You have made a happy customer and you were able to get rid of some old inventory which is a win-win proposition.
    2. Hireko Gift certificates have excellent sell through during the slow season

      You are probably getting some tire kickers walking into your shop looking to see what is new.  After all, what is there else to do?  Sell gift certificates.  Yes, that’s right! These don’t have to be just for Christmas.  Maybe your customer isn’t ready to purchase a set right now but will once the weather breaks and he or she can play.  By selling a gift certificate, they will be coming back to your shop instead of spending that money somewhere else.  Also, talk up the new stuff that you will get in or maybe just got in and make that customer excited about spending their gift certificate in your shop when the time comes.  The proceeds from the gift certificate make help pay the rent or one of those utility bills.

    3. Hireko Chipping Mats $44.95

      Do you have a net in your shop that is rarely getting used?  Sell time hitting balls into your net.  Just because there is 15 inches of snow on the ground doesn’t mean that customers still don’t have the desired to get in shape and knock off the rust.  After all, if there is that much snow on the ground, chances are driving ranges in your area will not be open.  Who knows, while they are in your shop, they may want to buy something new or get their clubs re-gripped.

    4. Co-op with another business or maybe a local pro.  Advertise that if someone buys a set of clubs, woods, irons, or over a certain dollar amount that player might receive a free dinner, movie or certain discount at another business that is in the same boat you are.  They can reciprocate by driving business your way.  Even offering a lesson with one of the local pro is a way make that set of clubs you just sold play better with proper instruction.

 

  1. Contact some of your old or repeat customers and offer a free bag check or tune-up before the season starts.  This might entail looking at the grips and recommending new ones or giving them a good cleaning.  Check out the shafts to see if the steel shafts are rusty or kinked or if the ferrule has ridden up on a club and offer to fix them.  Check the loft and lies on forged clubs and re-bend them if you see something out of whack.  Be creative in what services or checks you want to offer, yet honest with your customers! This is also the reason why you want to maintain an e-mail list as the cost to contact your customers is generally your own time.  It sure beats paying for post cards and postage or taking the time to call each one of those customers on the phone.

Hopefully some of these tips can help create some additional sales and generate interest when the season kicks into full gear.

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Tricking the Swingweight Scale?

One Phrase that Needs Eliminated from the Clubmaker’s Vocabulary

I have many pet peeves, one of which is the inaccuracy of certain terms or phrases.  The release of the new Winn Lite grips has me reading posts on a few golf forums I frequent saying that these very lightweight grips are only tricking (or sometimes called fooling) the scale.  I simply cringe whenever I hear that phase, so let me set the record straight.

What these posters are referring to is that the use of a lighter weight grip will create a higher swingweight.  I will agree with that as that is absolutely true statement.  But then the poster will go on to explain it by saying these grips are only “tricking” the swingweight scale. Well, unless they have secretly placed a piece of bubble gum on the scale to alter the balance, the measurements are accurate.  After all, the swingweight scale is nothing more than a simple lever that has been calibrated.

In a recent Webinar I conducted on swingweighting, I talked about the effect of the different components on swingweighting. For years, the standard weight grip (50 grams) has been the standard from which clubs have been manufactured to.  Ladies grips would be used primarily for female golfers and their smaller size would weigh slightly less as a result of a lesser amount of material used in their construction.  Conversely, larger grips would weigh more.  Some of which could be substantial if they were the jumbo variety.  However, when we talk about standard grip sizing the weights that had been available have varied little…up until now.

Introduction of lightweight grips

The new Winn Lite grips weigh as little as 25g.  That is half the weight of a standard grip, yet the same size.  So if you were to replace your existing 50g grip with one of these, the swingweight will increase by 5 points.  That is a fact.

Did the head become heavier?  No.  Did the club become longer?  No.  Did we “trick” the scale?  No.

These reason for this is the fulcrum point on a swingweight scale is located 14 inches from the butt end and the fulcrum point is what the club pivots around.  For each 5g of grip weight equals 1 swingweight point.

The swingweight scale was created as a way to measure the relation of weight distribution of a club.  A higher swingweight will mean that a greater amount of the weight is toward the head side of the club.  It is easy to understand that the use of a lighter weight grip will help the club feel more “head heavy”.

14” Fulcrum positioning with standard weight grip

On the other hand, the swingweight scale is not exactly set up the same way as you would hold a club.  That is, you do not hold the club 14” down from the butt end unless you have to create some very unusual shot.  No, the pressure point of your hands will be located approximately 4” from the end of the club.  If you grip down on the club, that dimension may be slightly greater.

The effect of grip weight is often misunderstood.  The center of the mass of the grip lies in the hands.  So changing from a 50g grip to a 25g grip may have little or no effect on the heft or what you feel when you hold the golf club.  In the past, grip weight was influenced by the size and that is a factor that golfers can easily feel.  Not so with weight. Let’s look at this from a more detailed example.

We have a 38.25” graphite-shafted 5iron.  The head weight is 257g, cut shaft 83g and our 50g grip.  If you were to balance the club and mark the position, you would find that this point is 29.5” from the end of the grip.  The swingweight scale measures the moments about the fulcrum point which is located 14” from the butt end.  Got that so far?

This would mean that the balance point of the club is 15.5” in front of the fulcrum point.  By multiplying this amount times the overall weight of the club, it produces a torque or moment of 6045 g-in or 213.23 oz.-in.  When the sliding weight of the swingweight scale is shifted until the whole club balance out, the tick mark on sliding weight will be positioned at D1.  It is that simple.  The swingweight does all the calculations for you.

14” Fulcrum positioning with light weight grip

Now let’s see what happens when we change the grip from the standard 50g to 25g like the new Winn Lite series.

For starters, the head weight, shaft weight and length did not change, so all that occurred was the overall weight of the club was reduced by 25g.  If we were to remove the club from the scale and were to rebalance the club and mark the position, you would find that balance point is 31.35” from the end of the grip. This is how the club becomes more head heavy or a higher percentage of the overall weight is shifted closer to the head.

This would mean that the balance point of the club is now 17.35” in front of the fulcrum point.  By multiplying this amount times the overall weight of the club, it produces a moment of 6307 g-in or 222.48 oz.-in.  When the sliding weight of the swingweight scale is shifted until the whole club balance out, the tick mark on sliding weight will be positioned at D5.

Introduction of 4” Fulcrum positioning with standard weight grip

If we made a swingweight scale with a fulcrum point that pivoted 4” from the butt end rather than typical 14” to come closer to replicating the position of your hands, it would look similar to this.

Note that nothing has changed on the club. Each component and the overall weight are the same as our first example.  The balance point is the same too.  The only difference is the moments about our new pivot point.  This same club that produced a moment of 6045g-in is now 9945 g-in (350.79 oz-in) using the new calibration.  We would no longer have our standard alpha-numeric designation to fall back on like D1, so we will have to use the moment measurements instead.

4” Fulcrum positioning with light weight grip

Let’s take the 50g grip and replace it with the 25g grip and see what happens.

While we saw a large change in the moments using our swingweight scale with the 14” fulcrum point, we didn’t see the same thing with the same scale but with a 4” fulcrum point.  This same club that produced a moment of 6307g-in is now 9957 g-in (351.22 oz-in) using the new calibration.

The real effect on grip weight

Take a quick look at the following table to recap these differences.

14″ fulcrum 4″ fulcrum
Moment with 50g grip 6045 g-in 9945 g-in
Moment with 25g grip 6307 g-in 9957 g-in
Difference 262 g-in 12 g-in
Percentage difference 4.3% 0.1%

Where there was a 262 g-in variance going from a 50g to 25g grip using the 14” fulcrum scale, it has less of a dramatic effect (12 g-in) when you use a 4” fulcrum point as our reference point. The reason is that the weight of the grip (or lack of) was closer to pivot or hinge point of what we were measuring.  When talking about golf club specifications, a 4% change is considered significant.  However a change of <0.5% is seldom noticeable.

Consider if we were to add 10g to the head in our example (267g / 257g) to achieve the same 5 swingweight increase as using a 25g lighter grip, this would represent a 4% change. Or consider a 5/6” (0.833”) increase in the assembled club length would also represent a 5 swingweight point increase (or a 2% difference).  When you look at the same 5 swingweight point effect of the grip weight, it pales in comparison.  This is what those people in-the-know are referring to when they say grip weight is only “fooling the scale.”

Consumers will need to understand why there is a need for ultra light grips (to reduce overall weight) and how to build and fit with them.  Don’t look at the lighter grips as a means of achieving a specific swingweight.  Let the swingweight naturally increase with the use of a lighter grip.  Only by experimenting yourself will you know how, or if, grip weight has any effect on your game.


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