Hireko Wants You To Help Design Our Next Driver From The Ground Up!

Like your drivers pear shaped? Tell us!Uncle Sam
Square? Tell us!
How about a 8 degree triangular shape with a thin carbon crown and interchangeable hosels? Tell us!

Hireko wants YOU to be a part of the design process for our new 2010 driver. Jot down any ideas you may have and post it as a comment on this blog. All ideas will be posted on this page and shared with the Hireko community.

As the process develops, you will be able to comment and tweak the design. We want to make this new driver a collaborative effort with you in the driver’s seat.

So put on your designers hat and give us your ultimate driver!

Disclaimer

Hireko reserves the right to reject or accept any ideas submitted to the design of the new driver. All comments and suggestions posted on this blog are the sole property of Hireko Golf.

100 comments

  1. […] your drivers pear shaped? Tell us! Square? Tell us! How about a 8 degree triangular shape with a thin carbon crown and interchangeable hosels? Tell […]

  2. Kevin says:

    It is obvious that every person is looking to hit the ball farther. I prefer a traditional pear shape, square face, with a solid feel and a louder than normal sound. I’ve always thought a drivers face should be designed like a “Web.” That’s right, a spider web. So the face would have a sweet spot in the center and branches out in all directions. So the face would be thinner along the “Web” portion of the driver, but thicker on the opening of the web. This would allow off center hits anywhere on the face to be closer to the .830 core. Ideally this would be combined with a great low torque shaft to be stable.

  3. Bryan says:

    The shape of a Taylor Made CGB, and the firm feel and sound of a 2004 Callaway Big Beartha+ in a 400cc Head size…That would be the perfect Driver

  4. Benoît LECHAT says:

    Why don’t you work anymore with UST ?
    They have such great shafts.
    It is really a bad decision.

  5. Richard Jiloty says:

    I’ve used flat lie irons for 35 or so years……more recently I was able to buy flat lie fairway woods and a flat lie utility club. Just last week I recieved my ICT driver – which has many adjustments – for me the only adjustment I sought was the extreme (3 degree I think) flattest lie setting – please include a flat lie option for the2010 design driver…..

  6. Christopher Peters says:

    I’d love to see drivers take on some of the same MOI theories integrated in putters. – where not only are weights pushed rearward towards the corners, but so is the actual physical mass of the club. Often putters (I think of “claw-shapes”) have the entire mass moved away from behind the ball – while something that extreme isn’t available with a driver head – certainly a more muted version is.

    The best example of the shape I have in mind is if you imagine looking down at the state of Ohio from above – drawing a horizontal line across the state south of columbus with that line being the face – and the lake erie coast, with the indentation of the coastline being the backside of the clubhead.

    Also – would it be legal to have interchangable weights at those points? Or would that start getting into fiddling with USGA MOI maximums?

    I now welcome you to use the right you’ve reserved to reject my idea :-D

  7. Frank Bornhoffer says:

    Triangular with soft transitional edges to retain some pear shape characteristics..External weight changing capabilities..”DL”(distance launch) designation(13* t0 14*)..Medium slate color finished top; black alignment mark with crown leading edge(3/16″) unfinished(polished same as face)…would personally shaft this with a sub 50 gram, firm shaft at 43 1/4″ butt trim..

  8. jim schlosser says:

    i have gone back to your 430 CC driver and hit it very well. i like the idea of a smaller CC driver that is off set and standard. players that have played along time don’t usually miss hit many shots. small i feel is easyer to hit and swing shape of club don’t matter to me. i’v played 40 +years, and have been using your clubs for a long time thanks

  9. Benno Wichert says:

    For me (traveling by air) is the most important feature to have interchangeable hosels to have the option to dismantle the driver head from a long shaft greater than 45 inch for protection.
    To modify the loft in the range of 2-3 degrees what also be super.
    I have no preferences for the head shape, except the sound should not be too strange.
    To hit the balls straight is more important than lenghts.
    Best Regards,
    Benno

  10. Steve says:

    Adjustable weighting . . . and I don’t mean removeable weight screws which are ugly. I mean internal weight ports. Club fitting is leading to a reduction in driver length, and I fit a lot of golfers to 43.5″ and 44″ drivers. Combine that with an ultra-light shaft, and I can’t get the headweight without squirting rat glue. For these golfers, I turn to Golfsmith and Wishon because I need to reliably get the headweight to 210g and even more. Can’t do that with tip-weights alone, but a weight port to insert powder or a fixed weight would do it.

  11. Bill says:

    Need to consider swing speeds – the component for the driver face should be as different as the shaft flex

  12. All good comments so far. For me, the most important thing is that the weight be very adjustable…which means 3 or 4 weight ports. For those of us who are using longer shafts (up to 48 or even 50 inches), a head weight that can be reduced below 185-190 grams is very useful. I also like the idea of a couple of different lie angles and of course various lofts (many people use a driver with way too little loft, then wonder why they can’t hit a fairway)…One other thing I’d like to see is some choices of face angle at the various lofts. The assumption is that, if you use more loft, you must be coming over the top…not necessarily true, and an other-than-square face angle can sometimes lead to misalignment. I like the shape of the Caiman driver, but haven’t actually hit it so I’m not 100% sure about it…but it looks nice and I both use and like the fairway woods. I, too, am a big fan of UST Shafts, and also Graman shafts…and I wish Hireko would offer them. The next best shafts are the Grafalloy’s and they’re starting to get too pricey.

  13. Bill Berninghausen says:

    Accuracy, not distance. The Perfect Driver was on the right track. 42 inches long. 13 degree loft. 400 cc, shallow-face head. Shape is unimportant unless alignment can be helped, maybe with a giant T or arrow. Neutral face–can’t align a hook face properly. Weight? Like Tom Watson’s old 3 wood, the equivalent of a double sole plate. No rec golfer will complain about 200 yards in the middle, since it will take 10 strokes off their game. They just won’t be able to brag about it!

  14. Sid says:

    I would like to see you guys design a driver head some what like the Cleveland high bore with a shallow face, concave crown, low center of gravity and elongated from the face to the heel. I hate having to tee a ball six inches off the ground in order to attempt to find the sweet spot with these 460 cc behemoths we have presently.

  15. Blair says:

    For some of us, the large (460cc) heads seem a bit large. How about designing a club where golfers could choose the head size of their driver? Perhaps giving an option for (driver) club head sizes between 325cc thru 460cc. Also, would it be possible to select a shorter shaft. I’ve hit some of the older persimmon woods that used a metal shaft of about 43 ½” inches. These seemed a little easier to swing than the longer shafts. Perhaps an option of having a shaft length between, say, 41 ½” and 45″ would allow golfers to fine tune their driver.

  16. Blair Becker says:

    For some of us, the large (460cc) heads seem a bit large. How about designing a club where golfers could choose the head size of their driver? Perhaps giving an option for (driver) club head sizes between 325cc thru 460cc. Also, would it be possible to select a shorter shaft. I’ve hit some of the older persimmon woods that used a metal shaft of about 43 ½” inches. These seemed a little easier to swing than the longer shafts. Perhaps an option of having a shaft length between, say, 41 ½” and 45″ would allow golfers to fine tune their driver.

  17. John Hill says:

    Square shape.
    Carbon Fiber crown.
    Four interchangeable weight ports. Two on the sides near the rear to tweak gear effect. One port on top of the crown and one port on the soleplate to tweak launch angle.
    Adjustable hosel.
    Face would be a new design. Use Bang’s triple wall design but only for the outer portion of the face. The sweet spot would remain a single wall design. The triple wall portion would be thicker on the eadge of the face and then gradually get thinner as you transition to the single wall design.

  18. Tony says:

    There is one driver design I always wanted to see.

    1. a weight port that allows for lengths from 43 inches to 45 inches.

    2. semi-shallow face, say around 50mm.

    3. it seems that the longer the front to back dimension, the better the launch angle and the better the forgiveness.

    4. multiple loft options. Most amatuers seem to benefit from 12 and 14 degree lofts.

    5. no extra bias or weight ports except to change length. higher loft supplies all necessary forgiveness.

    6. shaft options for mid and high launch.

    7. cupface design to help on off center hits.

    8. alignment marks on crown.

    That’s my driver wish list.

  19. As a 64 year old 13hcp I feel most drivers built have too closed face. I would like to see anywhere from 1 degree close to 1 degree open. Also I think a square or semi-square heads would work best for most players.I also find when you purchase a driver head the chances are the loft will be very high. I have bought 10 1/2 degree drivers and I hit them higher then my three wood. Its harder to find a true 10 degree clug anywhere. Make more even degree clubs 9,10,11,12 ect.. Once you find a great club head than matching a great shaft to a swing makes a club builder.

  20. As a 64 year old 13hcp I feel most drivers built have too closed face. I would like to see anywhere from 1 degree close to 1 degree open. Also I think a square or semi-square heads would work best for most players.I also find when you purchase a driver head the chances are the loft will be very high. I have bought 10 1/2 degree drivers and I hit them higher then my three wood. Its harder to find a true 10 degree club anywhere. Make more even degree clubs 9,10,11,12 ect.. Once you find a great club head than matching a great shaft to a swing makes a club builder.

  21. Adrian says:

    A grip that is slightly firm for good control, but tacky so you get a good hold of the club. The best shaft is one that has a bend point that will make the ball flight lower. A normal pear shaped head is best, with no grooves so the ball has less spin and will not balloon into the air. 8.5 degrees of loft (keep that ball low and in control). The head should be built to be quiet and not make a loud ‘ping’ noise so there is nothing to make you flinch throughout your swing(similar to the Callaway ft-3 driver, its great). The key is to make the ball stay low and in control. There is no point in making something that will go 15-yards farther but will make the ball climb into the wind and get lost in the woods. The fairway is where good scores and happy golfers are found.

  22. Bob Scofield says:

    I like the XK Offset driver I just bought from
    you. I would like to see this Offset head with
    an adjustable lie so I could put a flat lie on
    my driver. This to me would be a great design.

    Bob

  23. Gary Thompson says:

    I would like to see a 460 cc traditional shape head with a high COR and a low center of gravity. It would have agood MOI and a solid sound at impact. It should come in a variety of lofts, including a high launch for seniors, and maybe a degree or so offset. I personally prefer a cobalt blue paint job with a ball alignment logo. Looks really do count!

  24. Cliff says:

    Why not take the best of both design ideas and make a traditional looking head that tapers somewhat towards the back, but completes in a squared off back. This would be pleasing to look at for the traditionalists and also give an easier to square overall look with better balance.

    I would like to see a crosshair aiming aide on top of the club just above the face.

  25. Robert Mills says:

    1. Traditional pear shape
    2. Deep face
    3. Square face angle
    4. Mirrored finish with no grooves
    5. Short hosel with a chrome strip at the top
    6. Deep bore,
    7. Blackish grey (smoke) paint (fading from black to smoke would be ideal)
    8. 460cc
    9. Mirrored sole with silk screened graphics with the loft,model, and brand paintfilled in smoke.
    10. The mirrored sole plate should wrap around the skirt of the club about 1/3 of the way up.
    11. No alignment aid.
    12. It should be all titanium with NO carbon crown.
    13. 195 grams
    14. It should sound like a crack on impact and not a cowbell like some of the square heads.
    15. Also a simple name such as the Hireko P2 (P-squared for Power Play).
    16. Available in 7.5*, 9*, 10.5*, 12*, 13.5*
    17. Hand selection for loft and face angle available.

  26. Mr. Blair M. Phillips says:

    Selecting club head design has alot to do with course design. In my “humble” opinion, todays game has changed and not for the better. “Bombers and Gougers” is the way a articulate, well dressed,kind senior “lady” RCGA Rules Offical at the RCGA 2007 Mens Canadian Open described Mens Professional golf today. There’s no low or high shot making or draws or fades. Their all just “bombers and gougers”.
    I’m not a purist but I think the game needs to return to a course design that reflects shotmaking skills rather than “distance” as it’s focus. As far as club design goes, I play Persimmon woods and softer cover & low compression balls. The early(80’s)Roger Cleveland RC 85’s are functional & beautiful and the 1951 & 52 MacGregor Tourney M43’s are just beautiful to play golf with.

  27. Mr. Blair M. Phillips says:

    Selecting club head design has alot to do with course design. In my “humble” opinion, todays game has changed and not for the better. “Bombers and Gougers” is the way a articulate, well dressed,kind senior “lady” RCGA Rules Offical at the RCGA 2007 Mens Canadian Open described Mens Professional golf today. There’s no low or high shot making or draws or fades. Their all just “bombers and gougers”.
    I’m not a purist but I think the game needs to return to a course design that reflects shotmaking skills rather than “distance” as it’s focus. As far as club design goes, I play Persimmon woods and softer cover & low compression balls. The early(80’s)Roger Cleveland RC 85’s are functional & beautiful and so are 1951 & 52 MacGregor Tourney M43’s too!

  28. Steve Pearcy says:

    Since most dimensions are capped along with COR, two opportunities remain.

    1. improve aerodynamics to reduce drag and increase swing speed. This may actually mean a smaller face! But as soon a pro starts doing it, everyone else will follow.
    2. even more so with smaller face, the club must be more forgiving on off center hits. using webbing, variable thickness, etc. to accomplish this.

    Another few possiblities. How about custom (or alternative lie angles)? Would provide something unique and really give a better look at address for some players.

    Offer a zero or open face angle

    No weights or ports or any of that stuff. Keep a clean look.

    stay away from the changeable shaft options. only a few are going to fall for that – unless they are club fitters and need it for fitting.

    Have a .350 wood shaft option

  29. Richard Heck says:

    I would like to see Hireko produce a “draw”
    driver similar to Taylormade’s for those
    prone to slicing. I would also like to see more
    choices in loft.

  30. Charles Frank says:

    I would like to see a Driver that would be ideal for the beginner golfer or those with slow swing speeds

  31. Joe says:

    A square shape with max MOI. Im talking a square driver with a shallow dip in the crown to lower the COG to allow the ball to launch at the ultimate conditions. Moveable weights as well, square head design with weights, awesome!! Maybe inject a little nitrogen or enhaner of sorts into the head with a thinner face for max trampoline effect!!

  32. Hans says:

    My wish list in order of importance:

    1. Large sweet spot with maximum area returning at or near 0.83 COR.

    2. Muted sound. I hate loud drivers.

    3. A good selection of lofts from 8.5 to 13 or so.

    4. Available lie angles to +2 and -2.

    5. Cup face that wraps around a little to the body of the club without paint. Helps avoid scratches during bad mishits.

    6. Triangular head looks good and seems aerodynamic.

    7. Weight port for swing weight adjustment and/or adjustable weight near the back of the club.

  33. Jim Grant says:

    I think the 2010 Hireko driver should be a Hybrid of sorts. Hybrid irons are readily accepted now as easier to hit. Just like the Caiman Rawpower is easier to hit as a #3 wood because the shaft is shorter. I am a retired long drive crusher and have had my share of long drivers but always struggled with accuaracy. I think if you can create a driver with combined performance materials and shorten the shaft a little bit you can have a winner. If the volume goes a little below the 460 cc figure and shrinks the face a little that is OK as long as it performs. The list to incorporate is as follows by priority:
    #1 ICT type shaft changes.
    #2 Maraging steel face
    #3 Cup face design
    #4 Whatever crown and body shape design and composites that will accomodate the above wish list and also add to the overall aerodynamic efficiency and MOI.
    #5 Allow the weight to increase up to 208 grams (just like a #3 wood) and cut the shaft to 43.5 or 44 inches. Also design in backweighting in the grip if necessay. I know some of these things would fight the current trend but I know they can work. People will live with a smaller head if you can prove it is easier to hit! I was customizing drivers over 35 years ago and have some historic drives that were hit with old technology that are just now being challenged. Go for it!! Hireko is a great company and deserves a breakout product! Good luck.
    Jimboyayaya

  34. bob says:

    I would like to see a larger head for your ICT driver. A shape like the Caimon would be great.

  35. Zane Foster says:

    I would like to see a driver built that is about 400cc to 460cc in size. The shape to be pear shaped and preferrable in persimmon wood. But since you don’t make those types of heads. I would like to see a driver in 9 degree loft and 0.5 to 2.0 degree closed face angle. the driver would be in the 350cc to 460cc in size. The head would be traditional pear shaped and would have a clicking sound lile a persimmon driver instead of the loud ringing sound that most drivers make today. And of course they would have various lofts for each size and matching fairway woods. I currently hit a Dynacraft 400cc 10 degree lofted driver with a 1 deree closed face. The model is the DFS driver and matching fairway woods 3,5,7. The driver has a Penley G2-85 shaft and the fairway woods True Temper Dynamic Gold Lite shafts. But that’s just what I would like to see in a driver and oh no back interchangable weights or interchangable hosels.

  36. Nick Malatestinic says:

    1. Traditional pear shape, and all titanium
    2. Fully adjustable for lie and face angles
    3. Shallow face (50mm)
    4. Offer slight offset and closed faced models
    5. Black or dark gray in color
    6. 400-430cc’s
    7. A subtle crosshair alignment aid.
    8. Moveable weights 20-30 grams
    9. Nice muted to bell sound.
    10. Cupface technology with a plasma weld
    11. Keep price of the head under $100
    12. Equally important to have matching fairway and hybrid models available as well with similar adjustability for lie and face angle with less face progression.

    Keep up the good work Jeff. We appreciate the time and effort you put into making golf an easier game for everyone and not forgetting about the mid to high handdicappers.

  37. Big G says:

    Why not work from your Caiman 3 wood and develop a 460 cc driver that can be used at 43 – 44 inches? Why not also expand the shorter FW line of the Caiman to the 5 and 7 woods

  38. Llewscanon says:

    As a person who enjoys developing and testing head/shaft combinations, I certainly would love to see Hireko take a lead to “quick disconnect” hosels that would allow club fitters and tinkerers like me to experiment (with better scientific (quality) control). Someone will come up with a simpler (and cheaper) design for shaft interchangeability than the Conex or other approaches. Why not lead, as Dynacraft, in the past and Hireko in the present are wont to do?
    The PGA will ultimately back down under pressure from the industry and demands from golfers from a rigid stand against interchangeable shafts/heads. In the meantime I just have to keep epoxying and then carefully heating the heads to remove and replace shafts. With greater use of carbon crowns, it may get to the point that there is no reliable way to remove graphite shafts without damaging either the shaft or the composite heads unless a mechanical coupling/decoupling device is involved. Love this blog; first time I’ve tried to post.

    –Llew

  39. Flash111 says:

    Make a driver with a large sweet spot and place a Dorsal Fin on the tail end of the head for stability. This can also be adjusted left or right to prevent the face of the club from turning and therefore stop the slicing or hooking of the club.

  40. mike says:

    I think all the interchangeability is overrated, its great but once you find what works why do you want to change it? I like odd designs that make sense but look normal. I love the Hi Bores for that reason. I also think people care to much about MOI, we need to focus on consistency and feel. Thus, either have heavier head and use swing weighting or go with counter weighting. For the overall design this is what I will leave you with, i went to a range oneday without any clubs. They gave me what felt like a plastic drive with a middle out. There were 2 flanges at the top and bottom of the face and that was it. It was teamed with extra whippy steel shaft-best driver I ever hit-ball started low but climbed to the normal apex i loved that driver. I say break the mold no interchangeable parts, forget draw bias just work on a club that has great feel and a consistent ball flight…not much help but hey im simple like that

  41. Goran says:

    Great idea for some user input Jeff!

    1. Further develop square shapes. Fundamentally, this shape has a greater potential for high MOI given size limitations

    2. Use design clues on the crown to create a more traditional feel (inspiration from Nike Powerbow)

    3. Provide options for the better player — 9 degrees or so, square to open club face (option to avoid draw bias)

    4. Ensure acceptable sound. Q2 and Caiman was OK. Mantara was just too loud.

    In all else, optimize sweet spot and launch angle as much as possible (cup face, graphite or titanium crown)

    My 2 cents

    Goran

  42. KC says:

    I’ve liked both triangular and traditional pear shaped heads as long as the face height isn’t too shallow. A perfect driver would have a great feel (probably SP700) and sound of course. Ideally I’d want a square to open face (or the ability to adjust it), adjustable weight (just a single weight is fine, but I want to be able to get to 210g easily) and an erasable impact face so I can see exactly where I made contact.

  43. Butch Evans says:

    I would like to see interchangeable weights as wide, low and deep as possible, to manage swing weight, bias, launch, MOI, etc. . The hosel should be designed to allow loft and lie adapter/ferrules similar to Ping and Calloway. No grooves on the face. Milder or no bulge and roll.

  44. Kirk Blandford says:

    I feel the square head made a great inroad in both distance and accuracy. With square and triangle making large strides perhaps another shape. A “T” shape, the top being the face and the base of the “T” being more tubular with a screw on cap of different weights.

  45. Ed says:

    I always have trouble with alignment. Either the face of the club is not quite level and square or my body alignment is off. I think it would be helpful to incorporate a bubble level (like a carpenters level) that could be viewed to help the club face alignment.

  46. Ken Dettling says:

    Why not push the limit? a 470cc size that is extended to 5 inches with a somewhat concave top like the hi-bore. With a low center of gravity
    and a high moi we also need lower lofts like 7.5 and 8 degrees.

  47. AL says:

    I would like to see a variety of lofts, different models for different swing paths( ie: offset and upright lie for slicers), and movable weights to fine tune the ball flight. I currently use and 10.5 offset driver with a proforce 65 shaft and still have too high a ball flight ( 9.5 with offset and upright lie would be nice.

  48. AL says:

    I would also like to see a group of fairway woods to match the driver( titanium or HS steel face for max COR) . What about a hosel insert that would provide multiple lie options.

  49. Tom says:

    I trust you guys to make a nice looking, powerful sounding, well made, high MOI driver for us mortals. All I ask is that ALL OPTIONS are available to us lefties, as they are to the right handers.
    Thanks.

  50. DB says:

    The entire sole and face are one peice, with weights on the side, make it with max face height. Place a tungsten weight one each side of the face where it meeets the sole. Shorten it so it looks more like a cube but round. Make it out os SP700 TI.

  51. […] Comments Chris on Hireko’s 2009 Shaft Fitting Addendum Now AvailableDB on Hireko Wants You To Help Design Our Next Driver From The Ground Up!Ralph Larkin on The Relationship Between Loft and Face Angle Part 3Jeff Summitt on The Relationship […]

  52. Sam McNeil says:

    What ever is built would you please carry the line through the fairway and Hybrid in that same model.
    I still play my ping tec driver because I don’t hit any new club any better. Ilike the shaft and the smaller head.
    I may pull the shaft out of a spare one I purchase at a shop and put it in the new ICT model. Also I have two r7 ti’s that are no longer made, Is a new ti fairway wood coming maybe to match the ICT series.
    Thanks Sam

  53. Mark Pace says:

    First of all, thanks for listening to our advice. It is exciting to be a part of a club project created by fellow golfers.
    FLAT LIE, is very important to me. Is is not commen with most clubs, but it should be. I.E. Stand up to your club as you would be to address the ball, look at how much the front of the club is in the air and where the club actually rests on the ground. A FLAT LIE would be a more level club at impact. I have a 200 CC FLAT LIE driver that I use often, because it is more accurate and even with a small head, I can drive the ball far. Todays standard size clubs have too much of an upright lie, and would work great if we were all 6′ 2″.
    STIFF SHAFT graphite. It’s still lighter than steel, and more accurate than the regular flex used in most standard clubs.
    The two items mentioned are not the typical items used in todays manufactured clubs, but this is not your typical club.
    Right?
    Thank You!
    Mark.

  54. Your ICT hosel technology is very interesting. How about making this in a bigger say 440cc to 460cc model and more traditionally shaped? Wouldn’t it be more interesting to a larger profile of the golfer market? Does the weight of your hosel insert force your engineers to keep the size smaller? That can’t weigh more than 10 grams or so right? Just a thought… Thanks, Gary

  55. BobV says:

    Face angle is critical. There are WAY too many drivers out there with closed face angles but very little with open face angles, especially in higher lofts. I’d like those who use 11-12* lofted rivers to have an option of purchasing a driver with a 2* open face angle. There’s NOTHING on the market, so you would own the competition in this regard.

    Perhaps at EACH loft you can offer 2* closed, square, and 2* open. A survey was taken last year among users of 12* lofted drivers on the GEA forum, and the majority actually preferred the face angle to be OPEN, not closed, which is contrary to what component manufacturers and OEMs develop. So you would be a leader in this area. Not everyone slices the ball!

    Thanks,
    BobV

  56. Jeff Summitt says:

    Hi Gary:

    As you know, every gram is critical in a design and has to be accounted for. Without using exotic materials and greatly increasing cost, that was as large as we could make it and maintain a normal 200g weight.

  57. Brad Vanderwarker says:

    Jeff,

    Several of the Hireko links are broken at the website…do you know what happened?

    I’m looking to get the most current DSFI ratings…I’ve been a faithful follower of this methodology for years! Thanks for all your hard work over the years.

    Brad

  58. Jeff Summitt says:

    Brad:

    Please email me at jsummitt@hirekogolf.com with any links that you find are broken that way we can track them. Some of the links could be old and overridden like the annual addendum. The new 2009 Shaft Fitting Addendum can be found at the following link:
    http://www.hirekogolf.com/hireko/webpages/2009_HIREKO_TRIMMINGLENGTH.pdf

  59. Pete M says:

    460cc with interchangeable hosel. There has to be a way without increasing cost. In addition, a face with reduced roll similar to Wishon’s GRT for a consistent trajectory.

  60. Caleb says:

    As a club builder I would like to see your ICT head and shaft connection system work on any head; including your 2010 driver head. As one can see from the comments, the suggestion are all over the board. There are just as many flavors as people’s ideas. None are wrong or right, it’s just what works for them; which is what golf equipment technology is all about. Needless to say, the tried and true technology has to be included to compete with all of the other driver heads on the market, but I think you could sell the connection system to everyone once you prove having the advantage of adjustments on a given day would benefit one’s score. Even the pros don’t hit the same every day, so for the everyday golfer who could correct a block one day to straight by just turning the shaft would sell pretty good. I guess the best challenge would be to have a golfer come in with his driver and you set him up with your driver and show on a launch monitor (a demo on the course would be better), yours is better (lower spin rate, higher angle, etc). Of course this gets into fitting and I know that your company is interested in sales only. A weight port (as well as fade/draw weights) is a must so swing weight can be adjusted readily.

  61. […] Hireko’s “We want YOU to be a part of the design process for our new 2010 driver” campaign, we have received quite a few comments so far.  Not surprisingly there are a lot of […]

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  63. Bruce says:

    About two years ago I envisioned a driver that started with a cup face design made of alpha maraging steel.

    The hosel would be either a blind bore or I suppose to update the idea it could use the ICT prophet fixture. Either would be welded through the skirt of the cup face.

    The body of the club would be made of a hollow phenolic resin forming a symmetrical bullet shape at the rear with three weight ports.

    The body and the face/hosel of the club would have matching flanges that would accept either a contact cement or strong, flexible, high temp epoxy, then be clicked into a locked position.

    The target mass of the clubhead would be 184g. However, three weight ports could be used to increase the mass by 30g to 214g. Nylon plugs could be used instead of weights to reach the 184g mark.

    I would like to see this club setup square and be offered in 8.5º, 10º, and 13º lofts. I would like to see it in left hand as well.

  64. Bob says:

    I would like to see a driver that weighs 210 to 213 grams.Its almost impossible to get a proper swing weight or MOI with a 200 gram driver.A lot of golfers are going to 43.5″ clublengths and the only source is Golfsmith or Wishon for a club head that weight can be added.

  65. Robert Wasley says:

    Your next driver component should be all the usual, cup face, high MOI, variable face thickness, and allow interchangeable shafts. The feature that is missing in driver components today is a wide range of weighting options;i.e. 185~215 grams for draw or fade bias but also to allow longer (or shorter) shaft lengths with normal swing weights.

  66. Louis says:

    1. Same color theme as Power Play Caiman 3 wood.
    2. Reduce standard shaft length to 44 or even 43.5 inches for control.
    3. Use Lampkin Performance Plus grip to allow multiple hand positions on grip without being in short diameter area.
    4. Maximum MOI and Club CC.
    5. Square;not closed face in 10.5 degree loft.
    6. Bevel down front edge of bottom for occasional fatal over the top move.
    7. Regular flex black non glossy graphite shaft with minimal graphics.
    8. Matching rain resistant head cover.
    9. Do not want adjustable weighting or adjustable anything. Play it as is.
    Thank you.

  67. Louis says:

    1. Same color theme as Power Play Caiman 3 wood.
    2. Reduce standard shaft length to 44 or even 43.5 inches for control.
    3. Use Lampkin Performance Plus grip to allow multiple hand positions on grip without being in short diameter area.
    4. Maximum MOI and Club CC.
    5. Square;not closed face in 10.5 degree loft.
    6. Bevel down front edge of bottom for occasional fatal over the top move.
    7. Regular flex black non glossy graphite shaft with minimal graphics.
    8. Matching rain resistant head cover.
    9. Do not want adjustable weighting or adjustable anything. Play it as is.
    Thank you

  68. G. Moraskey says:

    TEAR DROP SHAPE, 60 MM BETA TI. C CUP FACE, 400 – 425 CC, WERE TALKING LONG DRIVE SPECS. GETTER DONE.

  69. M. Brown says:

    I prefer pear-shaped drivers, about 350-400 CC.
    However, I think you already have the design in your catalog.

    Just take the Power Play Caiman RawPower 3 Wood, and stretch it to 360 to 400CC’s. Use the same materials and technology. If its predecessor is any indication, this head will prove long, straight and durable.

  70. P.E. Peters says:

    If I may…

    Get rid of bulge and roll!!! The whole “gear effect” premise is garbage. If convex-faced drivers were more accurate than flat faces, people wouldn’t be hitting irons off the tee when control is necessary. The driver would be the most accurate club in your bag. The MOI actually keeps the ball on the club face long enough that the rounded face acts like the pull cord on a child’s top, making it spin outward. This increases the hook or slice, a LOT. I recently got an -almost- flat-faced square driver…the “Cube” by Affinity. It’s given me better control than I’ve had in years.

    Next…go to as much as a 14 degree men’s loft. I saw a computer model of swing speeds and loft, giving different spin rates and drive distances. Up to almost the pro level, increasing the loft to as much as 14 degrees (usually 12 degrees standard flexand 14 degrees senior flex) gives better distance. Plus, it helps those of us who don’t drive 300 yards clear those annoying fairway traps. More carry and less roll is a good thing on a driver in the VAST majority of cases.

    Many thanks!

  71. Mark Young says:

    Amen to the comments asking for more flat lie options. At my height I’ve found that 2 degree flat lie is my best option, but it is difficult to find, for example, any 2 degree flat lie hybrids or drivers at 56 or 57 degree lie. Do designers really think that everyone is 5’10” or taller?

  72. jason brown says:

    I just stumbled across a driver on Golf Digest’s website that featured a driver that oddly enough I believe was designed by an old Dynacraft employee Jeff Jackson that uses compressed nitrogen in the head to support the very thin (thinner than maraging or any titanium). The logic is that modern clubs that tout spring effect, the swingspeed would have to be over 100 mph to realize the spring effect. The idea is w/ nitrogen to support the ultra thin face, a spring like effect can be realized w/ slower swingspeeds in the 90 to 100mph range. I wonder if something like this could be tried, maybe w/ other inert gases, etc in a traditional pear shape design.

  73. SteveO says:

    More traditionally shaped or slightly triangular. Light weight crown. Hi MOI. Square face angle. Loft down to 9 degrees. Heavier weight options for shorter driver lengths. Deep black piano gloss finish. Solid, more muted sound (“PINK” not “DONK”).

  74. Mike L says:

    I like the idea of being able to change the loft and face angle of a club with the new adjustable clubs but I don’t think that they have come up with one that would be adjustable for lie angle. That would be a real plus. I also would like to see more of the cup face designs like the Raw Distance 3 wood that move the weld away from the face of the club. Matching 5 wood would be great.

  75. Richard Bacot says:

    Not sure if this the correct section for club design input. There are quite a few variables in dewsigning a club. Appearance, will attract or totally turn someone off. Sound, you want a club that has a sound of quality (similiar to the Taylor Made super-quad or the the Mellow Yellow squarehead by Bang Golf) great sounding clubs due to material type & quality. They don’t sound like a tin can. Turns players off & definitely sound cheap. Performance, the most important factor in a club. If you state you’re going to get 20 yards extra then the major brands, then design it to do that.

  76. Bernie Baymiller says:

    I build a lot of long drivers for seniors and have been since 1995. See my article on long drivers for seniors on Clubmaker Online: http://clubmaker-online.com/senior.ld.html
    I’ve found that built properly, they will get the player another 10 yards distance for every extra inch…some senior women get even more. And, I certainly agree with the first comment that driver lies are much too upright today….especially for long drivers. I’ve been forced to use large, very round heads so that even though the head is sitting toe-up, solid impact and direction aren’t compromised more than a bit. The square heads are almost impossible to hit squarely on any driver over 44″ for the average size adult. A 53°-55° lie would be much better for the average player’s driver, even at 45″.

    Some years ago (late 1990s), a small component supplier called Mars Golf introduced fairway woods called Cydonia LCGs. They are very large heads (eg:220cc 2W, 13° and 195cc, 15° 3W with 55° and 56° lies and only a 32mm face height), with flat, rockered soles, very much like the latest high MOI designs. My 2W is 45″ and 3W is 44″ long, very easy to hit and hits farther and higher than every big name 3W that I match it against every demo day. The Cy LCGs were discontinued about 2000, but I’d sure like to see someone resurrect that head design. I built over 50 sets for seniors here on our three courses over 10 years ago and almost every one is still in someone’s bag. I still have my 2000 catalog and can scan the photos if you’re interested. They are great high MOI designs.

  77. Don Cameron says:

    I like the new sizes and shape options that designers are playing with…. although
    I don’t really care for the square shape myself.
    I do like the face geometry of the newer heads – generally longer and lower.
    I find it distracting if the heads have too much bulge. Sound is a very important consideration… for feedback. Nothing feels or sounds as good as making very solid contact.
    Colour… how about something with more of a pearl or satin finish… it’ll look better longer –
    without the glare. I think that designers are utilizing multi material heads much better.
    I also think that other weight location options might be nice… why stop at just 3 screw locations?
    Alignment contours on the head really help.
    More subtle than dots or colour changes.
    And how about a driver with more than just 2 loft options? – Some of us still use the low lofted heads…. when you can find them.

  78. Troy in NJ says:

    I would like to see a square driver (similar to the Mantara) but with a sloped back, similar to the Cleveland HiBore series and most importantly a zero roll face, like the Wishon series or the old Pure Fit ones.

  79. vince gesualdi says:

    I like the comments I read about flat lies and lighter weight heads. Flat lie helps those of shorter stature and lighter weight means that a satisfactory swing weight can be acquired with a longer shaft. However since I have made many long shafted drivers, including one that required removing material from the head to reduce the swing weight, I need a head that weighs about 175 to 180 grams even if the head volume is below 400 cc and the material is not titanium but steel.

  80. Zamri says:

    I don’t know much about designing a driver but currently I’m using Taylormade Burner Draw and R7 460 Draw, the first thing I realised was that the Burner was easier to handle than the R7. I dont have to tee it to high to get the the ball up and my swing speed don’t have to be so agressive. So I think the next driver i.e. 2010 Driver should incorporate some of the characteistics of the Burner such as bullet shape, low face height. The weight should be put nearer to the face as it can help in accelerating the club on the down swing and help steady the clubface on impact.

  81. […] you have been following on our Blog, you probably have wondered what is the status of the “Hireko Wants You to Help Design Our Next Driver from the Ground Up!” campaign.  This just happens to be one of 17 club head projects I am working on.  Some of […]

  82. Tim J says:

    In my opinion these are what I look for.
    #1 high MIO if not max(if there is a max in moi)
    #2 COR at MAX.. no one will complain if they hit it 5 yards further
    #3 Aerodymic build.. too many clubs out there are actually designed incorrectly
    #4 A good nuetral look that will compliment any shaft(face it shape is just a look. If it hits like its supposed to no one will complain.
    #5 Cup face
    #6 HUGE sweet spot.
    #7 PLASMA welds
    #8 titanium build.
    #9 LOFT and LIE options… there is no one head right for everyone.

  83. Lindsey Ashley says:

    I’ve been thinking about a new variable weight system. Instead of the usual screw, how about layers…sorta like stacking pancakes…both vertical and horizonal. Weights would slide into the clubface with an internal bracket system to hold the weights. The screws would be offset to level up with the club face. A new novel sysem would make for a novel club which would catch the eye of golfanatics. The weights could be made of brass, stainless, titanium, or aluminum. The horizonal weights could be stacked to lower or raise the COG. The vertical weights chould be placed to correct a hook, slice, or fade. That’s my idea thanks LW Ashley

  84. Mike French says:

    The perfect Driver:

    For me it needs 4 things

    Easily interchangeable shafts

    Adjustable head weight for swingweighting, trajectory and directional control.

    A base weight around 200 grams with the ability to go +/- 20 grams.

    Available in lofts from 8* to 16*

    Except for the fact that I can’t find any additional shaft ends (so that I could use other shafts then the 3 they sold), the TaylorMade r7 CGB Max Limited is the perfect driver. 415cc head. Semi-trangular shape, interchangable shafts, adj head weighting. Responsive face, high MOI and max allowable COR. Ball go far, Ball go straight.

  85. The Shrink says:

    Several of my playing partners and I love to play overlength drivers. Even if you’re not playing particularly well, bombing a 300 yard drive is always satisfying. The problem is that the swingweight gets so heavy. I would like to see a driver head that is light enough and flat enough to feel normal at the maximum allowable playing length.

  86. Jeff Summitt says:

    The Shrink:

    We are introducing counterweights exactly for the purpose you are asking about. We should have them starting this week and you can view them at the following link:
    http://www.hirekogolf.com/hireko/orderportal/catalog_presentation/by_group/0/1592/0/0/0/0/0

    However, if you are looking for a lighter head, look at something like our Q2 driver and you can substitute the screws that come with the head for two 2g screws.

  87. Andrew says:

    my 2 cents
    #1 More traditional shape (enlongated pear but not a pure triangle)
    #2 multi materal weighting (Carbon Fiber Crown and sole, redistributing weight around and internally to create a balanced driver with high MOI)
    #3 a Pure sounding driver. A nice pitched ting instead of an aluminum bat sound. Using carbon fiber inside and out will help this
    #4 adjustible lie loft and face angle 3 degrees open or closed, 12 lie and loft choices (could be less)
    #5 plasma welded face with .83 cor
    #6 Longer lower wider profile
    #7 an aerodynamic sole and bottom
    #8 A mid to high launch shaft (something to compare to the Prolaunch Axis blue)

  88. Bill Smith says:

    Distance, distance, distance, what about feel and accuracy? Everthing is geared toward hitting the long ball. 50 gram shafts and 190 gram driver heads combined with 45″ or 46″ lengths. One slight hiccup in your swing and you can kiss that ball goodbye. There is not a box on the score card where you write down your drive distances but there is a box for score. I’d rather be 240 down the middle than 260 into the bushes. Let’s get back to heavier total weights, shorted lengths and higher lofts. Offer more fairway woods in higher lofts so you can launch the ball off the deck with greater accuracy. This trend is also in iron sets. Offer some iron sets where you don’t have to fill in between the PW and SW with a gap wedge. This is the hardest game in the World, so why are manufacturers making it harder by producing clubs that are harder to hit(longer with stronger lofts). You know everything in life is circular motion so lets get back to playing this game by making shots.

  89. Jeff says:

    I am a traditionalist. Enough with all the gimmicks and hype.
    What I like is a driver no bigger than 340cc with good balance through the hitting area.
    Something Tiger or Phil would use too.

  90. Vern says:

    I would like to see new drivers with smaller heads. I went back to a 350cc driver and my driving distance and accuracy both improved. The smaller head makes me focus on making good contact, like if I was using a 3 wood off a tee. I like a good solid sound that lets you know when you struck the sweet spot on the clubface, but not so loud that it draws alot of attention. A square clubface and a small mark on the crown for alignment gives me confidence during setup.

  91. […] Check out the previous “Design our next Driver” blog posts: Part 5 Part 4 Part 3 Part 1 […]

  92. ricky says:

    i think that options should be available with the shaft closer to the center of the face, allowing for an easier to release (open to shut) motion. think of a center shafted putter. i don’t know if the extreme of a center shafted driver would work, but i do think that getting the sweet spot of the club closer to the axis of the shaft could be interesting.

  93. I’ve been evaluating Customizing the Driver Crown on my assembled Drivers by using Pinstripping for visual directional appearance.
    By accident when hitting these Customized Drivers at a local Driving Range I noticed that taking back the Driver generated an
    alignment characteristic similar to my Mallet Putter. This improved hitting the Driver’s Sweet Spot with more consistency which gave
    me added distance and straightness control.
    Today, many OEM Driver Designs are using Weight Screws, CG/MOI Improvements and Head Geometry to improve distance & straightness flight..
    However, they have overlooked the Driver take-back alignment problem.

    The shape and sound of the Geek Fail Safe 3 Driver is Great.

  94. JUST SAY NO USGA says:

    Pretty much what they all say above…

    Although, I would like to see a 480-500CC head, with huge MOI, COR around 87,88.. super high but not breakable high. Very very areodynamic to make up for the extra large face. Not too light, I want enough weight (over the limit) so the club squares it’s self. I want a club, my mom can swing and hit 250 yards, (with a 6o mph swing speed) A club, I can just swing about 60-70% power and not worry about hurting my bad back, and still get great distance and extreeeeeeem forgiveness. Something so non conforming, it will make all the club makers in the business cry that they did not have the guts to make it first! We all know it can be done. You can add a “rubber” behind the face to increase COR and spring face effect, while adding protection. Maybe even a spring, that you wind up, and is released when you swing that pushes the face forward after inpact, giving you a higher COR than would be possible just by a solid face. OF course you will get players using it to hit 400 yard drives, but that it ok, because it will make you millions!!!! But there are a ton of older players who will love you for this. And those are the golfers with money, who want to keep playing!

  95. R J Stoltz says:

    460cc pear shaped or deep back – adjustable weigts 2 center front & rear & 2 heel & toe for maximum center of gravity change on both axis – square, face foward, ‘hot’ face with appropriate bulge but with no roll for more consistant launch – 57 degree lie bendable or w/ adjustable hosel inserts to adjust lie by 1 & 2 degrees & hosel inserts to adjust face angle 1 & 2 degrees for each lie – 8,9,10 & 12,13,14 degree lofts And… matching 4 wt. fairway woods 14 & 17 degree same lie & wt., 18 & 21 degree same lie & wt. & 22 & 25 degree same lie & wt. all marked w/ degrees not #’s And… matching 3 wt. hybrids 18 & 20 degrees same lie & wt., 21 & 23 degrees same lie & wt. & 23 & 25 degree same lie & wt. also w/ no #’s – both fairway & hybrids w/ hot faces no roll & bendable hosels. In other words a completely matched set for varied swings & abilities.

  96. Ruger Thomas says:

    I’d like to see in addition to the current ICT hosel/insert, an integral customizable weight to change the feel of the clubhead. No need for TM R7/9 weight ports because the ICT hosel controls ball flight. I never liked it when I would play my Mizuno MP32’s where you can feel where the head is throughout the swing and then I’d pick up my driver and the feel is opposite of my irons. For guys like me that aren’t overly concerned about swing weights rather than just playing what feels good, I would like to see an integral weight plug/insert added to the ICT hosel configuration. I think the savvy club makers who are knowledgeable about swing weight would get into that as well even though they have been using plug weights or other methods for years. What do y’all think about that?

  97. Jeff Summitt says:

    Ruger:

    If we were to add a port for weighting, it will consume additional weight and force us to make the club smaller or resort to a much more expensive manufacturing method to allow for a 200g head.

  98. Roger Gregrich says:

    According to the U.S.G.A. Drivers are built to be tested with a swing speed of 110 MPH in order to get the Trampoline effect, so when my swing speed is only 82 MPH I do not get any Trampoline effect, so it looks like when you get older and lose speed and distance the U.S.G.A. could care less. So why don’t you build a Driver to help all of us with slower swing speeds to be able to get the Trampoline effect so we can continue to enjoy the game again??

  99. Jeff Summitt says:

    Roger:

    The trampoline effect exists regardless of the speed as you are still getting some been benefit, but perhaps not as much as a stronger golfer. The USGA does not differentiate the charteristic time (CT) for different swing speeds therefore to make conforming drivers, we have to design around the existing rules.

  100. Richard says:

    A lot of interesting ideas here!

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