A professional golfer is someone who has honed his or her swing for many years and through dedicated practice is able to have a consistent and trusted swing they can rely on time and time again. If you were to hand a professional golfer a new custom golf club to try, it will usually take only 2 or 3 swings to know whether that club is suited to them or not. After which, they are good enough to alter their swing to make the club perform, but they won’t want to put that club in their bag as it creates another swing thought for them to try to master.

A professional race car driver is someone who has honed their skills behind the wheel for years as well, usually with many different types of vehicles not limited to race cars, but street cars, go carts, etc. But a professional car racer did not start out that way. First they read everything they could about their sport. They went to different race tracks; spoke with drivers and even crew members. In fact, they learned everything they could beforehand, including going to school and gradually building up their seat time behind the wheel.

Only a select few are privileged to obtain the status of a professional race
car driver or even professional golfer, rather most do it recreationally and
rely on others around us to have an understanding on limitation to avoid potential
hazards to others. What about a beginning driver? Before someone is legally
allowed to be on the road, that person goes to a driving school to learn all
the rules that are associated with the privilege of driving a motorized vehicle.
Not only do they learn the written rules, but also must spend some time actually
driving in the presence of a trained instructor. After a certain period, that
person is required to pass a two-part test consisting of the rules and the actual
driving before every obtaining a license to be on the road with other trained
drivers.

However, this same analogy cannot be used for golfers, at least in the US and many other countries, but may serve as a good advice to those thinking about entering the game. Instead, a beginning golfer can go into a number of retail outlets, shop on the internet or even build their own club from golf component parts. Without any instruction they head off to the golf course and find that the game is more difficult than they thought. Unlike a golf course where there might be signs along the fairway advising the golfer to reduce their speed at certain distances from the green or to avoid an upcoming ravine or ditch, the golfer is pretty much on their own.

Decisions on equipment can be just as confusing as well, plus there are a number
of individuals selling their wares that may not have the necessary means of
informing the new golfer. Ever golfer will need a set of clubs to start. One
such possibility is called a starter set or a boxed set of clubs. These are
usually broken down in gender. For men, these are typically going to comprise R-flex (regular) shafts. These were designed to be affordable and fit a golfer
reasonably well that is of average height (or stature) and strength (approximately
85-90 mph). If a big strong athletic man or a frail elderly gentleman was to
use these clubs, or someone overly tall or short, had massive hands, etc., these
particular club may not perform that well based on the strength or special features
of the golfer. This is one of the reasons why there are so many equipment choices
available and there is a certain need to conduct some entry level golf
clubfitting
.

A new golfer should ask questions from their potential equipment supplier the
same as if you were to ask for advice from a swing instructor or fellow golfer
about the etiquette of the game. If the equipment supplier does a good job listening
to their needs, they can advise you into equipment that should work reasonable
well for your situation. After that, it is up to the golfer to learn how to
swing the club efficiently and practice to gain an understanding of their strengths
and weaknesses as well as the tendencies their ball goes. From there, the golfer
can upgrade their equipment and potentially go through a more advanced fitting.
Remember that whether one is a professional race car driver or golfer, they
had to start out somewhere and heed the advice of those around them to get to
where they are today. So sometimes all it takes is to ask a question. At Hireko,
we are here to help.

2 Comments on What’s The Best Way To Learn Golf?

  1. Randy says:

    So many different people telling you what to do where do you start.?

  2. Jeff Summitt says:

    Randy:

    Having multiple people tell you conflicting advise can be as bad as too many chef’s in the kitchen. Limit the advise to someone you feel comfortable with and explains it in simple terms. This might be a local teaching pro or skilled golfer that is a family member or friend. Taking lessons will help from either the pro in individual or group lessons, but you will need to practice those skills. Realize that this game is difficult so you won’t be hitting the ball like the players you see on TV. While it might be frustrating at first, keep in mind that this is a fun game in the back of your mind.

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