A common repair that most of you will be faced with (or have been faced with in the past) is the extending of shafts. Extending shafts is a relatively simple operation that can add substantial profits to your shop. Today’s tip involves the extension of graphite shafts and steel shafts. A few tips to follow:

Extending Graphite Shafts

1. Never extend a graphite shaft more than 2″. Any more may cause premature failure due to stress where the extension is made.

2. Always use either graphite or aluminum to extend a graphite shaft. Using steel will create a shear point where the extension is made, causing almost certain shaft failure.

3. Always epoxy the extension in place, do not rely on a pressure fit.

4. Try to abrade the extension piece prior to installation to give the epoxy a better hold.

5. Saving your old graphite shafts to use as shaft extenders will save you money and will make a perfectly acceptable extender.

6. Remember that extending the shaft will make it feel a bit more flexible and that every ½” longer the shaft becomes will increase the club’s swingweight 3 points. The total weight of the club will increase equal to the weight of the extender and epoxy as well. The club’s balance point will move toward the grip end as well due to the longer length of the club.

Extending Steel Shafts

1. Never extend a steel shaft more than 2″. Any more may cause premature failure due to stress where the extension is made.

2. We recommend using a steel extender to extend a steel shaft.

Using other materials may lead to premature breakage. Wooden dowels can also be used to extend steel shafts, but these require much more work (in our opinion) than using steel extenders.

3. Always epoxy the extension in place, do not rely on a pressure fit.

4. Abrade the extension piece prior to installation to give the epoxy a better hold. This is especially vital when using steel extensions that are unplated.

5. Saving your used steel shafts to use as shaft extenders will save you money and will make a perfectly acceptable extender.

6. Remember that extending the shaft will make it feel a bit more flexible and that every ½” longer the shaft becomes will increase the club’s swingweight 3 points. The total weight of the club will increase equal to the weight of the extender and epoxy as well. The club’s balance point will move toward the grip end as well due to the longer length of the club.

Extending shafts is a common and profitable repair. Following the above common-sense rules will make the repair practical and safe.

by Jeff Summitt
Hireko Technical Director
jsummitt@hirekogolf.com

11 Comments on How to install golf shaft extenders

  1. Sam Martin says:

    Do I need to apply epoxy to the exterior of the butt/extender joint? I’ve installed graphite extenders ( length <2″ ) and note decided movement in a couple clubs, maybe I didn’t allow enuff setup time before instlaling grips. I’ll remove the grip and try roughting up the extender per this tip.
    rgds
    S

  2. Jeff Summitt says:

    Sam:

    It is probably best to use the same 24 hour shafting epoxy and allow it to cure the full length. You want to apply the epoxy the the stem of the extender and rotate it in the butt end of the shaft to make sure that the entire surface is coated with epoxy. In addition, you may want to check the fit of the extender. Unlike steel shafts where the extenders tend to fit more precisely, graphite shafts don’t. There are a few different sizes to choose from and it is good to have some of each on hand to decide which one to use.

    Sincerely,

    Jeff Summitt
    Hireko Golf

  3. al L says:

    I recently lengthened my steel irons by 1/2 inch with a steel insert. Only played one time with them but have hit many balls on the range with them. I am surprised that they feel so heavy to me. I have recently switched from graphite irons to steel and wanted to duplicate the length that I have been used to with the graphite. do you thing I will adjust and get used to them? Would a graphite insert add less weight n be as strong?

    Thanks… I have to admit that I did hit them much better as the round progressed… the first 5 holes were scary~~~~~~

  4. Jeff Summitt says:

    Al:

    You only want to use extenders designed for steel shafts otherwise you might run into a breakage issue. Regardless of what you extend the club with, the head weight is further from your hands which will make it fee more head heavy. The reason why they feel heavy is the weight difference between the graphite and steel shafts, thus the reason why you normally graphite-shafted clubs longer than steel. But I would play with them a few more times to get a true evaluation. If they still feel too heavy you can always select a lighter steel shaft or go back to graphite.

  5. al L says:

    If a graphite shaft in a Taylor R5 driver is extended by 2 inches am I significantly changing the swing weight? I am assuming the answer is yes, so if I choke up on the club as needed, do I effectively make the club a lighter swing weight. I noticed as the round progressed today, the driver felt much heavier than at the beginning of the round. Thanks a bunch.

    I ended up removing the extenders from my steel shafted irons due to too much weight. see above post..

  6. Jeff Summitt says:

    Al:

    Swingweight is swingweight, so by choking down on the grip you haven’t reduced the actual swingweight of the club. However, the club will feel lighter as your hands are closer to the head. Let’s say you extended the club 2″ and choked on the grip 1″. This would be the same as if you only extended the club by 1″ and held it at the end.

  7. R Crandell says:

    Like most golfers, I have accumulated several putters. I would like to extend the length of 2 of them to belly-putter length. One is a steel shaft putter 10 to 15 years old, the other a graphite shaft putter 5 to 10 years old. I have not yet removed either putter grip. How can I be sure that I acquire the correct putter extender? Are the shaft diameters generally standard? If so, what are the standard diameters? How close do I have to measure my shaft ID or OD? Rick

  8. Elmer Ignacio says:

    I bought 5 of your graphite shaft extenders via Amazon in order to use with drivers and fairway woods graphite shaft. However, that portion that inserts into the shaft is way too thin (small) for the shaft’s hole. Can I still use them? HOW?

  9. Jeff Summitt says:

    Elmer:

    What was the code of the extender you purchased? Also, what shaft are you trying to extend? The answers to those questions should help determine if you can still use them.

  10. carl says:

    I just moved the grips 1/2″ up the shafts and did not put an extention in any at all. as i normally leave 1/2″ clear at the end of the club when gripping it did not affect anything but gave me the extra length i wanted. Idid this over a year ago and it has been ok .. no cracking or other bad signs, just normal grip wear.

  11. Jeff Summitt says:

    Carl,

    I am not even sure the club would be conforming as the grip would move. You may want to ask the R&A if they consider that as conforming to the Rules of Golf is you are maintaining a handicap.

Leave a Reply